Volume 5, Issue 2, December 2019, Page: 8-10
Rehabilitation of Phonetic, Esthetics and Function in Subtotal Maxillectomy Defect by Cast Partial Obturator: A Case Report
Nancy Raj, Department of Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Institute of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
Rajesh Bansal, Commonwealth Fellow, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Institute Of Medical Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi, India
Received: Jan. 24, 2019;       Accepted: Mar. 28, 2019;       Published: Dec. 24, 2019
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijcda.20190502.11      View  530      Downloads  120
Abstract
Rehabilitation of hemimaxillectomy defects with prosthetic obturator can be challenging in term of providing adequate retention, support and stability to the prosthesis and expected outcome. Nasal reflux and hypernasal voice are the two major sequel after surgery that can affect patient social involvement and can have great psychological impact. The prosthodontist is limited by the properties of the materials available for facial restorations, the mobility of soft tissue surrounding the defects, the difficulty of establishing retention for large prosthesis, and the patient ability to accept the outcome. The outcome of prosthesis can be improved remarkably due to better coordination between surgeon and prosthodontist and careful designing of prosthesis. Dramatic improvement in the acceptance of prosthesis is seen if the prosthodontist participation can begin early in the course of patient care which ultimately will increase the quality of life (QOL) of the patient.
Keywords
Subtotal Maxillectomy, Obturator, Cast Partial, Phonetics, Quality of Life
To cite this article
Nancy Raj, Rajesh Bansal, Rehabilitation of Phonetic, Esthetics and Function in Subtotal Maxillectomy Defect by Cast Partial Obturator: A Case Report, International Journal of Clinical and Developmental Anatomy. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2019, pp. 8-10. doi: 10.11648/j.ijcda.20190502.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2019 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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